Stapp Inspires-One Step Ahead

Welcome back to Stapp Inspires Teacher Highlight! We are taking a trip back to the Innovation Center of St.Vrain Valley Schools to meet with Thom Ingram. Thom is an Instructional Technologist at the Innovation Center.

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The Innovation Center fills a unique place within the district and the staff reflects that with their skill set and expertise. Thom is no different, having spent 10 years in higher education before working for Apple. After spending 10 years working for Apple he started his career as a high school English teacher. I asked him what took him from working at Apple to wanting to teach high school students. He chuckled and said, “My wife.”  His wife asked him if Apple was going to be his career. Being a poet by birth and training he knew eventually he wanted to teach high school students, and the question was why not now? After teaching English in Fairfax County, Virginia for two years, the opportunity to move to the St. Vrain Valley and be apart of the Innovation Center was presented to him. The rest, as they say, is history.

While I was meeting with Thom, I caught a small glimpse of what it would be like to be one of his students. A staff member from St. Vrain came in with an issue on her Macbook. She didn’t come up and ask Thom if he could fix it, she went right into the Tech Lab where two students were working and began discussing the issue with them. He excused himself and went to observe the student who was diagnosing the Macbook. It is worth noting that the students who work in the Tech Lab have taken a class at the Innovation Center to become Apple certified Mac technicians. When Thom was at Apple, he was a Creative, instructing customers on how to use their Apple products, and an Apple Genius, repairing customer’s devices. He has taken the same curriculum and teaches it to high school students. No other high school in the country has a similar program. While in the lab, another student is troubleshooting a robot that will not connect properly with an iPad. The student finds a solution, but Thom encourages the student to shut everything off and try again to ensure that the problem is truly fixed.

I asked him what was his favorite part of his job. Thom said, “To watch students in 8th or 9th grade, who are finding their place, and see them become 11th and 12th graders who are now confident enough to present their ideas to CEOs.” The growth and development of students inspires Thom. I made a comment that it must be difficult to try and keep up with the pace of technology and be able to continue to give students the real world experience that helps give students a competitive edge. He smiled at me and replied that he has never taught the same class twice. He paused a moment and followed up with, “Any job is hard if you don’t love it. Doing what you are meant to do is easy.”

Thom has a natural ability to install confidence in his students. His students are free to come up with ideas, try them out, and if they don’t work, try again. His quiet confidence in his students’ abilities allows them to succeed beyond what even they thought possible. He gets excited to give students real-world experiences in high school that will help them further their careers once they graduate from St. Vrain Valley Schools. He instills the idea that learning new things is exciting, fun and cool.

Thom, thank you for your dedication to your students. We wish you the best as the Innovation Center looks to grow and expand in the coming years.

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Stapp Inspires Spotlight- A Hope for Longmont

My car said 56 degrees when I arrived at the warehouse. It was mid-December and we hadn’t experienced “winter” yet, but the tell tale winds from the Northwest was a sure sign that this was going to be the first cold night of the winter. It’s late afternoon and when most people are getting ready to go home, this group was getting ready to start their work.

This month we are pleased to start our Stapp Inspires Spotlight of HOPE for Longmont. Throughout the year we will be sharing the stories of the different people involved with this organization. We will introduce you to Lisa, the director of HOPE for Longmont. We will give a glimpse at what happens at the shelter every night. We will look at the different volunteer opportunities. And share the stories of the volunteers who are reaching out to the most vulnerable in our community.

Check out this short video with Lisa Searchinger, Executive Director, for HOPE. Take a look as she gives a little background on the organization.

So what is HOPE for Longmont? HOPE stands for: Homeless Outreach Providing Encouragement – H.O.P.E. – supports people experiencing, and at-risk of, homelessness in Longmont, while offering programs and referrals that encourage movement toward self-sufficiency. This fall Boulder county launched the Coordinated Entry System. This system streamlines the process of providing people with the information and support that they need to continue on their journey of self-sufficiency.  In the past help has been spread out amongst different agencies and providers. The new model improves coordination and better aligns resources to those who need it most. With their new coordinated entry program, H.O.P.E strives to break down the barriers in getting the appropriate support and help people need. The ultimate goal has and will always be their clients attaining and sustaining affordable housing.

 

But that does not capture the heart of the people behind the scenes that give of their time and effort to ensure that everyone in our community has a safe place to stay each night. The genuine care and concern was evident in everyone that I met. I walked in the warehouse and Lisa whispers me a “Hello”, she is on the phone explaining the new Coordinated Entry program. I’m then greeted by Sarah, the Program Manager for HOPE, we go on a little tour of their warehouse. The generosity of the community is on full display. The warehouse has blankets, warm clothes, shoes and toiletries. These items will be taken to the shelter or Search and Save in the evening.

Side note: Search and Save is where HOPE volunteers go out each night to look for clients who either do not know about the services available or have barriers accessing the new coordinated system.

We move on to where the Soup Angels will be arriving shortly to drop off hot meals for the evening. Soup Angels volunteer once a month to provide a hot evening meal. Typically two or three different families, or groups volunteer on a single night. Tonight’s volunteers include a lady who has been providing meals for several years and a family that moved to Longmont 3 months ago and wanted to start giving back to their community. As I watch the Soup Angels pack up their meals in the coolers that will go out to the shelter, a few more volunteers arrive. Susie and Scott are teaming up tonight for the Search and Save part of HOPE’s outreach. Both have been volunteering with HOPE for a number of years now. Susie signed up to volunteer this particular evening because Scott had already signed up. Scott didn’t know who was going out with him until he arrived at HOPE and was thrilled when he learned Susie was going out with him. We will be highlighting these two a little later on, you won’t want to miss that.

I chat a little bit with both Susie and Scott as they get the van loaded up for the evening. They pack up the coolers filled with the meals from the Soup Angels and a few extra paper bags of food to hand out while they are out on the streets. Their first stop will be at the shelter to drop off the coolers of food the Soup Angels provided.

The sun has set and night is upon us. It’s time for me to head over to the shelter. The night time shelter rotates between 4 churches in Longmont. Heart of Longmont, United Church of Christ, Faith Baptist and the Journey Church have all partnered with HOPE to provide a warm and safe place for people to sleep for the evening. Tonight’s shelter is being held at the Journey. Once I arrive I find a line of people waiting to check in. People are able to check in two at a time. A volunteer looks to see if a client has been processed through coordinated entry, if not a worker from the county is on site to start the process. Once in clients are asked if they need a shower or a wake up call. Then it is off to find a spot to stay for the evening.

Alice, the HOPE shelter coordinator, offers clients the chance to secure their personal belongings. Due to space restrictions, large backpacks are put in a separate room for safe keeping. After most people have been checked in Alice announces that the meals are here and are ready to be served. I go back to help pass out meals and am struck by the thankfulness of everyone I serve and soon everyone is sitting down to a hot meal.

I watch Alice touch base with all the clients she is serving. Like everyone else I have encountered, the genuine concern for those at the shelter and still on the streets was real.

We are so honored to partner with HOPE for Longmont and help support them in their mission. If you want to learn more about this inspiring organization or would like to get involved please visit http://www.hopeforlongmont.org We hope that you will continue to check back in as we continue to highlight HOPE for Longmont!

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Stapp Inspires Teacher Highlight- An Agent of Change

Welcome back to Stapp Inspires Teacher Highlight! This month we are proud to introduce you to Alex Armstrong, International Baccalaureate Coordinator for Sunset Middle School.

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Alex has been a part of St. Vrain Valley Schools for the last 17 years. She started at Prairie Ridge Elementary School and has been at Sunset Middle School for the last 13 years. We decided that a coffee house would be a fantastic place to meet and talk about Alex’s role as the school’s IB Coordinator.

I had heard of the International Baccalaureate (or IB) program before, but didn’t know much else about it. It is a rigorous academic program that focuses on preparing students to be agents of change. Helping students see themselves in this light begins with the Primary Years Programme (PYP). Each of the subsequent programs build on the foundation that students need to be both active and serving in the community. In the PYP, students have the opportunity to present a capstone project. The Middle Years Programme continues on that foundation with Community Projects as well as preparing students for high school. When a student enters the Diploma Programme in high school, the idea of being  strong, active global citizens is firmly established. The Diploma Programme also requires students to submit an Extended Essay project. This helps ensure that students who graduate from the Diploma Programme are college ready. St. Vrain Valley Schools is fortunate to be able to offer the IB program between kindergarten and twelfth grade. Alpine and Central Elementary are the IB elementary schools in the district with Sunset Middle School and Niwot High School rounding out the program.

Part of the IB program is to develop the 10 attributes of the Learner profile. This is applied to every student in an IB program, no matter where they may be going to school. Alex explains that every subject is balanced and interconnected and the projects are supported by the academics. This allows students to see how what they are learning in math, science or language arts is connected to each other and to the real world. By taking this approach students are given the opportunity to see how they can make real-world impacts on their community.

This is what drives Alex, to encourage her students and team of teachers (she still teaches part time in addition to being the IB coordinator) to figure out how they can make a positive impact on the world around them. She told me that the coolest part of her job was watching her student’s growth and the gains in confidence. She loves talking to her students about what their plans are and how they are going to execute them. She is the calm, quiet cheerleader in the back inspiring her students to push themselves beyond what they thought that they could do.

She is dedicated to the teachers who are journeying along side her. She helps coach her fellow teachers in what the IB program is, how to write unit plans that make the lessons relevant to the students, and what they are learning in other classes. Alex never hesitates to praise her co-workers saying, “They are the most incredible group of teachers. Everything they do is for the students. We come up with really innovative ideas on how to make learning relevant to the students.”  Alex is trying to get her students more tied into the community and make the classroom more real for her students. She wants her students to leave knowing how to inquire about the world around them.

I had one question for Alex I had meant to ask in the beginning. I knew in high school being a part of IB was an option. I asked if that was the case for middle school as well. She said that in middle and elementary schools it was “wall-to-wall”, meaning everyone was a part of the IB program if they attended the school. As with any school in the district, they accommodate all students. Alex spoke of a student with an IEP who was shy and quiet. During this student’s eighth grade research night, they were able to share, and answer questions about their project proudly and confidently. Alex said watching this student’s growth was an encouragement to the entire staff. She hoped that she had been able to make a positive impact on this student and that they continued to push themselves when they went to high school.

As our time wrapped up, I asked Alex a question. If she could tell her eighth grade students one last thing before they went to high school, what would it be. She laughed and said I should have sent that question over before we met. She reflects on the question and answers, “You each can change the world.”

Alex, thank you so much for all the effort you are pouring into each student who enters Sunset Middle School. Thank you for encouraging your students that they can change the world at a young age, they don’t need to wait until they are grown. We wish you the best!

Stapp Inspires-A teacher’s teacher

Welcome back to Stapp Inspires Teacher Highlight! This month we step into the office of Diane Lauer, Assistant Superintendent of Priority Programs and Academic Support. Right away, I enter into a warm and welcoming office – Diane, herself, is no different. She has been with St. Vrain Valley Schools for six years, serving the past two as an Assistant Superintendent.

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With a title as long as hers, I wanted to dig in and learn exactly what that label meant. Diane holds a bachelor’s degree in Political Science and Speech Communication. After graduating college Diane began a career as a Consumer Advocate and Mortgage Loan Officer. She soon found that this career pathway did not ignite her passion. On the advice from a friend, she decided to enter into the world of education. This led her to a reservation in New Mexico where she obtained her teaching certificate and fell in love with teaching. She spent three years on the reservation, during that time she completed her second bachelor’s degree in Education with a emphasis on English as a Second Language.

Leaving New Mexico, she came to our great state of Colorado and for ten years taught middle school Language Arts and Social Studies. She was an innovative teacher who loved to try new techniques and different ideas to encourage her students to succeed. She was often called upon to help other teachers implement these techniques in their classrooms. Her mentor encouraged her to become a principal and she loved it. She loved seeing the positive impact she could have on an entire school. She also realized the great responsibility of this position – how her influence affected, not one class of students, but several classes over many years. She was drawn to her current administrative role because she felt she could impact every student in St. Vrain. She doesn’t take this responsibility lightly. In fact the day we met, she had been visiting with schools, personally. She takes every opportunity to visit schools because it is invigorating and exciting to see what is happening in the classroom.

After we discussed what brought her to St. Vrain, we move on. I do want to mention, that at this point, I was wishing I could have been one of her middle school students. You can tell she challenged her students and expected you to give your best. You wouldn’t have cared because you knew she believed in you and encouraged you along the way. She’s a natural-born teacher that always reflects on how she can use her current position to help positively influence students within St. Vrain Valley Schools.

A big chunk of Diane’s time is spent working on professional development – not only focusing on classroom teachers, but administrators and classified staff as well. By investing in professional development, the entire St. Vrain workforce improves, which in turn leads to greater learning opportunities for every student. We continue this discussion on how this plays out in the district. From providing standardized training for all district employees – First Aid, Design Thinking, Safety and Security – to customized school-level training, Diane oversees all of these things.

I could spend even more time describing all the different programs the district provides, but I would be doing a disservice to everyone reading this. I don’t think I can accurately convey the passion Diane has for her job and the people she oversees. She believes wholeheartedly that every student, teacher, staff and administrator can succeed, if the right support is in place. She is excited to move to the new Innovation Center of St. Vrain Valley Schools, so she can help accelerate the professional growth of others in the district. She truly enjoys watching teachers grow and succeed in their own careers.

We finished up our interview, and as I was leaving she left me with this, “I couldn’t imagine being anywhere else. I’m a part of an energized and supportive community. I’m honored to be here. It’s great being a part of the community.”

Diane, thank you for all the behind-the-scenes work you do. Your passion and caring nature is an asset to St. Vrain Valley Schools and the community as a whole. Thank you for caring so deeply for those around you. We wish you all the best!

Stapp Inspires- Behind the Scenes

Hello! Welcome back to our Stapp Inspires Teacher Highlight! During the last several months, we have been introduced to some amazing teachers, coaches and administrators in the District. This month, we are going to switch gears and take a step out of the classroom. We are going to take a look at someone who works tirelessly behind the scenes. This month’s highlight is Board member Paula Peairs.

Paula was elected to the school board in 2013 and was recently re-elected to a second four-year term. Paula represents the Mead and Skyline feeder systems. While she does represent those areas, she feels a responsibility to the entire community for the success of the District. She is the proud mom of two St. Vrain alumni and still has one in the District.

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I had a chance to meet with Paula and learn a little bit more about her and her journey to the school board. Her journey is a relatable one. She started by volunteering in her children’s schools and attending PTO meetings. From there, she was elected PTO president and eventually wound up being one of the founding members of Grassroots St. Vrain. This group was focused on painting an accurate and truthful portrait of school funding, and clearly communicating the needs of the school district ahead of the 2008 mill levy override. From there, she joined Leadership St. Vrain where she discovered even more about District operations and education-related legislation.

Running for a position on the school board was the next logical step for Paula. She grew up in a community that strongly supported schools, and felt she could highlight what was going on in the District. Paula believes very strongly that community support is one of the greatest strengths of St. Vrain Valley Schools.

I asked Paula to give me an overview of how our school board functions. To start, St. Vrain has seven board members where most districts only have five members. By having a larger school board, there is more representation of the community and more ideas. Board members are elected to four-year terms on odd years. Each board member may serve two four-year terms. On election years, either three or four seats are available. Board members are elected “at large”, meaning they represent a specific area, but still make decisions about the success of the entire District. Board members help guide the direction of the school district as a whole.

 

We also discussed the difference between a bond and a mill levy as there is a big difference between the two. So, if you are like me, and didn’t realize the difference, here is a quick run- down. Voter approved elections for school districts generally involve either a capital improvement bond or a mill levy override. Both of these are funded through established mill levies that generate property tax revenues to pay for expenditures. A mill levy is the “tax rate” that is applied to the assessed value of a property. Capital improvement bonds are sold and the proceeds are used strictly for physical improvements – brick and mortar projects, technology and other enhancements. These bonds are typically repaid over 20 – 25 years and the mill levy sunsets – or ends – when those bonds are completely repaid. Through a mill levy override, community members vote to increase the mill levy rate to fund local schools. Funds generated by mill levies can be used for operational expenses, professional development and increasing overall student achievement. This mill levy can either sunset or continue forever depending on the approved ballot language. Because capital improvement bonds and mill levy overrides are used for different District resources, community members might see school districts ask for a bond one year and a mill levy another.

I asked Paula what was the biggest success she has been a part of as a Board member. She said, “We have so much community support. Superintendent Haddad has been able to gain the trust and support of the community. That has been invaluable in helping make sure we can provide equitable resources to each student.”  In the past, smaller communities in the District have felt overshadowed. The Board has worked hard to make sure resources enjoyed by larger communities are available to the smaller communities as well. She emphasized that it shouldn’t matter which zip code you live in, because every student should have access to highly qualified staff, safe learning environment and the latest technology.

She went on to explain that, because of the District’s size, they are able to do things on a larger scale. The District has looked at ways to centralize operations as much as they can. Having a central office focused on bus routes, food service, finance, and human resources allows principals to concentrate on the administration of their schools. The Board wants the principals to be building coaches, to know what is going on in their schools, and to be able to create an environment supportive of learning.

Our time was almost done, and I had one last question for Paula. I wanted to know what she had most enjoyed about her time on the Board. “Hearing community stories and being able to share my knowledge and resources with the community. There was a time when new school boundaries needed to be drawn and people couldn’t wait to leave their school. During a recent boundary meeting, parents came in and asked for their students to remain at their current school because they love the teachers and staff where they are. I’m optimistic about the future of St. Vrain Valley Schools.”

Paula, thank you for helping make St. Vrain Valley Schools one of the top districts in the state. We appreciate your time and for serving on the Board. Because of caring, involved people like you, the students of St. Vrain have amazing opportunities.

Stapp Inspires- The Sound Track of High School

Welcome back to this month’s Stapp Inspires Teacher Highlight! This month we step into Josh Kirkwood’s band room. Josh is the band director for Mead High School. He has been at the school since 2009 when the school opened. As a former band kid myself, I was excited to have the opportunity to highlight what happens in music rooms across the district.

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As Josh and I walk into the band room, we are greeted to the sounds of students practicing different music, others working getting caught up on homework and others just a break from their day. We get settled down in his office and a guitar class provides background music as we meet.

The stream of students in and out never stops. Some need to warm up lunch, a few need a chocolate fix (the band is selling candy bars as a fundraiser). Josh knows them all by name. Instead of being an interruption they are part of the rhythm that exists in this corner of the school. About 25% of the student population is involved in the music program in some way. Mead High School offers four band classes, three orchestra classes and five choirs. It is not uncommon to see a cheerleader or football player marching during halftime.

Josh and I begin our conversation with the early success of the band. Within two months of the school being opened they were receiving superior ratings at competitions. With any new program you are trying to find your identity and what is going to be important. Josh had tried to be a competitive band, but quickly realized that wasn’t a good fit for this band. Instead, they focus on being a show band who marches cleanly, plays songs people can sing and dance to and most importantly have fun.

Josh is a proud papa bear when he talks about his kids. He sees the students struggle and wrestle with music he puts before them. He encourages them to work on it, play it again and again until they get it. The students probably don’t realize the lessons he is so quietly (or perhaps loudly, depending on musical notation) teaching them. That they can persevere and work through challenging obstacles. It might take some time and you will have to rely on those around you, but don’t give up, you have what it takes to make it. He instills and requires a certain amount of respect for each other and themselves. You will find his band standing and applauding for the other schools performing at the District Band Night or when they compete. He encourages his students to thank those who have served in the military.  He feels if he can get a student out of their own way, they are capable of accomplishing so much.

I asked Josh what makes being a music director so enjoyable. He pauses for a moment while he ponders my question. “Band kids are the coolest kids,” he begins,” They are also some of the smartest too. We are able to move and connect to the world in a different way. They are just good kids to begin with.” Josh is well aware that he has a unique place in his students lives. Most teachers will have a student in their classroom for a semester or two. Some of his students will enter his classroom every day starting with their first day freshman year to the last day of their senior year. The band room becomes a haven for these students. A break in an otherwise busy day. Where they can take a moment, come together and create something beautiful.

While this seems to a pretty serious conversation, the mood quickly turns. We start talking about pep band. Apparently Josh’s feeling is what is the point of home court advantage if you aren’t using it? This is where the stories start being told and I couldn’t control my laughter if I tried. As a former band member I remember that being put in a gym, which is pretty much an echo chamber. Most of us take it as a personal challenge to see how loud we could get. It’s good to see that somethings never change and these kids have taken it to heart. At some point in time the band was asked not to be so loud or use their instruments while the basketball game was being played. Remember when I said that band kids were smart? They had permission to make noise and now opponents face a laundry list of barn yard noises.

 

I had one last question for Josh before I left. I asked Josh if he could tell his seniors one thing, one piece of advice to pass one before they graduated from his band room, what would it be. As he thinks about it, I can tell he is thinking of each and every student who is in band. He is reflecting on the four years of time they have had together. The memories, successes, failures, the jokes they have played on each other. His words are few…..”Don’t forget how wonderful you are.”

 

 

 

Stapp Inspires- A Principal’s Vision

When was the last time you thought about how your child’s school functions? The identity of the school, the systems in place that help it function on a day to day basis, the culture of the school? If you were given a blank sheet of paper and were told you could design a school however you saw fit, what would it look like? What would you include? What would be your priorities for the school? What if that was happening in your community right now?

In November 2016, the residents of the St Vrain Valley Schools passed a $260.3 million bond measure allowing for significant renovations throughout the district and the construction of several new schools as well as a district-wide Innovation Center. One of the schools under construction is Erie PK-8 (this is just a placeholder, until the naming process is completed this spring–there will be several opportunities for the Erie community to provide input before the school board votes on the final name).  Erie residents have the unique opportunity to help design the perfect school for their community.  This month’s Stapp Inspires Educator Highlight focuses on the founding principal of this new school, Cyrus Weinberger.  

 

I had the opportunity to meet Cyrus at Erie High School to discuss the design of the physical building, the hiring of a leadership team, and the planning going on behind the scenes. So far this has been the only interview where hard hats, safety vests and closed toed shoes were needed.

If Cyrus’ name sounds familiar, it should. He was the founding principal of Red Hawk Elementary in Erie which opened in 2010.  This school has had several notable accomplishments including the President’s Council for Nutrition and Physical Fitness Community Leadership Award, Child Obesity 180 Innovation Competition National Award and a Kaiser Thriving Schools Grant to name a few. Cyrus was the driving force behind implementing the All School Movement Program. This program provides students with 35-40 minutes of vigorous activity a day, in addition to P.E. and recess. Giving students the opportunity throughout the day to get up and move is a passion of Cyrus’. He hopes to build upon the successes of Red Hawk to collaboratively develop a vibrant learning community where students can experience a rigorous academic environment while engaging in project- based activities.

Cyrus is excited to work with a variety of stakeholders to create the vision for the new Erie PK-8. Starting in November, there will be a series of community meetings scheduled throughout the year (click here to sign up for the Erie PK-8 newsletter or start giving feedback). This is your opportunity to give input as to what the school should look like. What type of learning environment will it be? What programs are most important to you and your student? Starting in October, the hiring process for the leadership team, consisting of teacher representative from each grade level, specialist teachers (art, P.E., etc) and parents will begin. This will be the group responsible for defining the vision for this new school. Cyrus is eager to engage with the community and figure out how to make this the best school possible for them.

Cyrus is looking forward to using his experiences of starting Red Hawk to help build this school. He states that he feels honored to be entrusted once again to start a school on the path to success. The concept of a PK-8 school has great potential, as it allows for extensive collaboration between teachers as students make the transition from preschool, to elementary school and the sometimes difficult leap to middle school. The proximity to Erie High School helps to support the transition from middle school to high school. This model provides unique opportunities for curriculum acceleration as well.

At this point we head out to the construction site to do a tour of the school in progress. As  I tour the construction site, it is clear that this 131,000 sq ft building will be a state-of-the-art facility. The school is being built to hold about 900 students, with 4 classes at each grade level. There are two dedicated Maker Spaces and a Media Center as well. The building sits on 22 acres, which includes 3 different playgrounds, an outdoor amphitheatre, track, athletic field, and baseball field.

 

 

As we were headed back to the high school after the tour, I kept coming back to the Red Hawk Movement program. I knew it something close to his heart. It turns out Cyrus was “that” kid growing up–the one who was bright, but couldn’t sit still. The one who spent more time in the principal’s office than out of it (he kept a book in one his principal’s office for his frequent trips). Over time he learned that he could focus better if he got up and moved before he sat down to focus. He knew how it made him feel, and he tried to incorporate movement breaks for his students while he was teaching. After doing some research on his own, he found that 20 years of scientific research supported what he knew all along.  If you want to hear more of Cyrus’ story check out his TED Talk or Colorado Education Initiative talk.

As we finish up I have one last question for Cyrus. I ask him what is the one thing you want the community to know. He reflects for a minute before answering: “Your voice will be heard. Only through working with the community can we achieve the greatest heights in rigor, innovation and educating the whole child. It is increasingly important to create learning environments that encompasses all these traits.”

 

Cyrus, we look forward to watching your journey as you collaborate with the community to create a school from the ground up. We wish you all the best and can’t wait to tour the building once it’s completed!